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Enjoy a Good Food in Liechtensteiner

Posted on 05 November 2020 by marycimeni (0)

Liechtensteiner has always been a top choice for many tourists around the world. As you may know, it has wonderful tourist spots to visit but aside from the main attractions. It is also home to popular restaurants that serve good food. When you get, make sure you don’t miss any of this local food. 

Torkarebl 

Torkarebl is a customary Liechtensteiner dish that includes cooking cornflour with milk, water, and salt. This strength lies somewhere close to a porridge and a dumpling, and after it’s been heated up, the mix is ordinarily signed in margarine. Torkarebl is infrequently found in cafés and it’s generally joined by elderberry jam and some espresso with milk as an afterthought. 

Hafalaab 

A customary dish of Liechtensteiner cooking, hafalaab is viewed as one of the nation’s public strengths. It commonly comprises a soup or stock containing wheat and cornmeal dumplings, and it’s normally seasoned with smoked bacon or ham. When an aspect of the neighborhood helpless man’s eating regimen, basic fortes like this one are these days regularly set up at home and they’re once in a while accessible at eateries. 

Liechtensteiner Fish Stew 

Liechtensteiner fish stew is a customary dish from Liechtenstein made with a blend of dim rye bread, sprats, fish, for example, snapper, cod, or mahi-mahi, tomatoes, green onions, potatoes, garlic, celery, parsley, marjoram, smoked paprika, olive oil, stock, and flavors. The mix is stewed until the vegetables become delicate and the fish is completely cooked. When served, a cut of rye bread is first positioned onto a serving plate, and afterward it is secured with the stock or squash blend, liberal bits of fish, and the mix of tomatoes, potatoes, sprats, and the stock. 

Ribel 

Previously, ribel used to be a feast eaten by poor people, generally for breakfast, yet everything changed during the 1970s, and now numerous cafés serve this customary Lichtensteiner dish. Much the same as polenta, ribel is produced using cornmeal that is cooked in bubbling water and milk, and once cooked, it is broiled with margarine.